San Francisco to reveal first results of study to build on Caltrain railyard, boulevardize I280

Next week Tuesday, February 23, the San Francisco Planning Department will present the first results of a study exploring the possibility of adding buildings and street connections on land currently used to park Caltrain trains and shadowed by the 280 freeway.   The study is exploring the potential to:

  • improve the “Downtown Extension” connection of the Caltrain tracks to Transbay, exploring whether (or not) it is possible to make the connection move trains faster, for less cost, and sooner completion
  • create a “loop track” to the East Bay for greater capacity for the Transbay station
  • improve crosstown connections between Mission Bay and the rest of the city for people taking Muni, walking, bicycling, and driving
  • add infill development between Mission Bay, SoMa, and Potrero Hill, providing housing, services and jobs

The study is expected to assess the costs and operational consequences for Caltrain service of moving some or all of the railyard train storage and maintenance.

The initial report won’t yet have estimates about the cost of changes and the time to implement them.  Cost and time information won’t be available until Phase II, slated for next fall/winter.

RailyardStudySchedule

The project page asserts that this new approach is not expected to affect the construction schedules of the Downtown Rail Extension (DTX).    How might this relate to the proposals being floated for a second transbay tube? What about removing and redeveloping part of I80 instead?   Bring your thoughts and questions.

If you are interested in Caltrain and/or High Speed Rail in San Francisco, and the evolution of the neighborhoods near the rail corridor, come if you can on Tuesday, February 23, 6-8pm, Potrero Hill Recreation Center, Auditorium, 801 Arkansas Street.  The location is not far from 22nd Street Caltrain, or the 10-Townsend from 4th and King.

Optional registration is here: http://rab.eventbrite.com.  For more information, see the SF Planning department project page.